HEXEN 2.0/Tarot, 2009–11, Archival giclée prints with watercolour on Hahnemühle paper, each 29.7 x 21 cm

HEXEN 2.0/Tarot, 2009–11, Archival giclée prints with watercolour on Hahnemühle paper, each 29.7 x 21 cm

Crafting an alternative history of the twentieth century through cybernetics, psychedelia, and tarot, Suzanne Treister’s sprawling projects trace a vertiginously networked world where everything is connected and nothing is meaningless. By Lars Bang Larsen

 Guggenheim Museum, New York, Countryside: the Future

Rem Koolhaas and Samir Bantal, “Countryside, the Future”, Guggenheim Museum, New York

The countryside is synonymous with the desires for escape, health, self-sustainability, and many other things that might well describe the current mood under the threat of corona. DEAN KISSICK weighs in on one exhibition that presents the nether reaches as just that: somewhere far away. 

 Screen grabs from Yuchen Chang’s iPhone, February 2020, Courtesy of the artist

Screen grabs from Yuchen Chang’s iPhone, February 2020, Courtesy of the artist

An art market in limbo forces considerations of what art means today.

Still from Still Life (Betamale), 2013, single-channel video, 4:54 min, courtesy of Jon Rafman Studios

“People are repeating history without the knowledge of their doing so.”

Thebe Magugu, SS18 – Gender Studies
Figures of Fortitude (2018)
Photos: Aart Verrips, creative direction & set: Thebe Magugu, assistant: Nhlanhla Masemola

Fashion has built a trap for itself. The most contemporary medium may still pride itself on being ahead of the curve, but it has fallen prey to a totalised corporate capitalist realism that is closing the door on a new generation. Where will it go with its need to rebel and experiment?

 Vitrine with original documents and letters of Paul Neagu 

Vitrine with original documents and letters of Paul Neagu 

An exhibition at Spike Berlin, 30 January – 14 March 2020, organised by Salonul de proiecte 

Jutta Koether at Artists Space

With the dawn of a new decade comes the possibility that all could start over, be good again. DEAN KISSICK takes us on a journey in search of exhiliration in art, theatre, and elsewhere. Follow his trek from Mexico to New York, out of the glum and into glam and glee.

What did you get for Valentine’s Day? Some New Yorkers were treated to a unique blend of sexual energy and frustration in Irena Haiduk’s “Cabaret Économique”, performed at the Swiss Institute, New York.    

Now Zero has been a staple at Spike online, but now, fittingly alongside Brexit, we also bid farewell to Ella and her column. Fear not, Ella will continue to scrawl across the walls of Spike’s print pages, and there will be others to take her spot, though not her place. You’re not reading it properly unless you click through and play all the links at once. 

Lucas Mascatello

Does art still exist?

 Photo: Susannah Baker-Smith

Photo: Susannah Baker-Smith

Is the body the last thing left alive?