Discourse

 DJ Nigga Fox Photo: Marta Pina

DJ Nigga Fox
Photo: Marta Pina

Joel Mu and Marlene Engel on the Wiener Festwochen's electronic music festival Hyperreality and its roots in content, community and culture

 Video still from Coca-Cola's 1971 commercial "I want to teach the world to sing"

Still from Coca-Cola's 1971 commercial "I want to teach the world to sing"

In this month's column, Dean Kissick goes back to the Summer of Love to understand how we landed in our atomised present.

Beau Dick
22 masks from the series Atlakim (1990-2012)
Photo: Mathias Völzke

Michel Auder
Gulf War TV War (1991, edited 2007)

Edi Hila
Comers (2016-17)
Photo: Mathias Völzke

 Dana Schutz,  Open Casket  (2016), Oil on canvas, Collection of the artist; courtesy Petzel, New York.

Dana Schutz, Open Casket (2016), Oil on canvas, 99 x 135 cm; Collection of the artist; courtesy Petzel, New York.

 Chiho Aoshima  City Glow , 2005

Chiho Aoshima 
City Glow, 2005

In this month’s column, Dean Kissick looks at Superflat America, the rise of hikikomori and their connections to alt-right meme culture.

 Richard Prince Untitled (cowboy), 1980-1989

Richard Prince
Untitled (cowboy), 1980-1989

In this month’s column, Dean Kissick considers Richard Prince's disavowal of his artwork and the destabilisation of reality.

Toke Lykkeberg on the suspension of art in a state of emergency

 Lucas Cranach the Elder, The Fountain of Youth, 1546. Lime panel, 122.5 x 186.5 cm

Lucas Cranach the Elder, The Fountain of Youth, 1546.
Lime panel, 122.5 x 186.5 cm

Texts from Berlin Biennale's Young Curators Workshop

 Courtesy the artist and MERU Art Foundation.

Still from Jol Thomson, G24|0vßß (2016).
Courtesy the artist and MERU Art Foundation.

Texts from Berlin Biennale's Young Curators Workshop

In his monthly column, Dean Kissick examines the culture of a collapsing society.

 © Gerhard Richter 2016 (21112016)

Nicolaus Schafhausen, Director of the Kunsthalle Wien, on Gerhard Richter's Mirror (1981)

What does Freud’s Dora have to do with the Kardashians? Chiara Bottici and Jamieson Webster on an old soap opera – and a new one.

 Photo: Guy Ferrandis / SBS Productions

Sarah Nicole Prickett on Paul Verhoeven's new film Elle

 Screenshot von „Brandon", 1998

Claire L. Evans on "Brandon", a groundbreaking cyberfeminist work by artist and sci-fi filmmaker Shu Lea Cheang from 1998.

 JODI.ORG, 1995  www, browser

JODI.ORG, 1995 
www, browser

Four short hypotheses about net.art by Domenico Quaranta. The artists UBERMORGEN, JODI, Vuk Cosic, and Olia Lialina respond with their own take on what happened.

Dean Kissick reports from the world’s largest video game conference and trade show

 Geoengineeringwatch.org, 2016, Gesso and charcoal on canvas, 230 x 166 cm

Geoengineeringwatch.org, 2016, gesso and charcoal on canvas, 230 x 166 cm

R. Lord talks to Ché Zara Blomfield about her first European solo exhibition

 Asger Jorn  Stalingrad, No Man’s Land, or the Mad Laughter of Courage,  1957–1960, 1967, 1972 Oil on canvas 296 x 492 cm © Donation Jorn, Silkeborg / Bildrecht, Vienna 2016. Photo: Lars Bay

Asger Jorn 
Stalingrad, No Man’s Land, or the Mad Laughter of Courage, 1957–1960, 1967, 1972
Oil on canvas
296 x 492 cm
© Donation Jorn, Silkeborg / Bildrecht, Vienna 2016. Photo: Lars Bay

Curator Alison M. Gingeras on Asger Jorn’s 'Stalingrad, No-Man’s Land, or The Mad Laughter of Courage' (1957–72)

 Armen Avanessian Photo: Dirk Skiba

Armen Avanessian
Photo: Dirk Skiba

How can theory have an effect on the world? Armen Avanessian’s answer would be: only by making it go faster. With books and conferences on Accelerationism and Specu­lative Realism, as well as his participation in an art film earlier this year, he has attempted to free philosophical thought from the narrow bounds of the academy and bring the Left up to speed with financial capital­ism. Why does he find the art world so appealing?

 Julia Scher Surveillance Bed III , 1994 180 x 240 x 180 cm

Julia Scher
Surveillance Bed III, 1994
180 x 240 x 180 cm

We all know that transparency is no longer a magic formula that automatically leads to greater emancipation. By contrast, in order to win back a piece of humanity and freedom, we will have to become our own censors. In various recent artworks Barbara Casavecchia finds the building blocks for a new culture of silence.

 Rob Pruitt, „Cocaine Buffet“, 1990’s     

Rob Pruitt, Cocaine Buffet, 1990s. 

 

 

The Art World's Favorite Mind-Altering Substances: A Sociological Study

Fulvia Carnevale, part of the Paris-based collective Claire Fontaine, and theoretician Rory Rowan, have a number of complaints. Art is increasingly becoming a job, there is too little time left for thinking, and artists have to act like rock stars to please collectors. Is there still hope?

A nihilist’s guide to the unbelievable success of the young European fashion label

 Speakers at "Finding the Body: The Last Transgression" Hannah Black, Evan Ifekmya, Cadence Kinsey, Patricia McCormack, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Guilia Smith

Speakers at "Finding the Body: The Last Transgression"
From left: Evan Ifekmya, Hannah Black, Cadence Kinsey, Patricia MacCormack, Giulia Smith, Hannah Quinlan, Rosie Hastings,

From strategies of exposure to those of concealment, feminist artists are finding new ways to address the female body as a site of projection, voyeurism, or even dissent. Theorist and educator Maria Walsh attended the “Finding the Body: The Last Transgression?” symposium in London last week, and offers her take on the dialogue between feminisms old and new.

 Chus Martínez Photo: nici jost photography

Chus Martínez
Photo: nici jost photography

Can art generate new cultural forms?

 Cady Noland is a prime example of exit from the art world, yet her work from the 80s and 90s about the violent sides of America remains eloquent. This is Tanya, titled after the nom de guerre of William Randolph Hearst’s granddaughter, who was kidnapped by the Symbionese Liberation Army in the mid-70s and joined the group.   

Cady Noland is a prime example of exit from the art world, yet her work from the 80s and 90s about the violent sides of America remains eloquent. This is Tanya, titled after the nom de guerre of William Randolph Hearst’s granddaughter, who was kidnapped by the Symbionese Liberation Army in the mid-70s and joined the group. 

 

Now that the human is no longer central to history – replaced, instead, by networks and systems – we need to reconsider the old question “What is to be done?” It’s never been harder to make your own rules for how to act. How to continue? Acceleration or exit? Lars Bang Larsen thinks these are false alternatives and searches for new, fluid forms of action.

 Post Human Neue Formen der Figuration in der zeitgenössischen Kunst Deichtorhallen Hamburg 11.03.1993 - 09.05.1993  Künstler im Ausstellungsaufbau:  Angelika Leu-Barthel

Visitor in front of Hand on Breast (1990) by Jeff Koons
Deichtorhallen, Hamburg 1993
Photo: Angelika Leu-Barthel

The 1992 group show “Post Human” explored how the Internet, artificial intelligence, and plastic surgery were changing what it meant to be human. The exhibition‘s curator Jeffrey Deitch travels back into a past future.

 Thousand Islands Thousand Laws , 2013  Live simulation, sound, infinite duration Courtesy of the artist, Pilar Corrias Gallery, Standard (Oslo)

Thousand Islands Thousand Laws, 2013 
Live simulation, sound, infinite duration
Courtesy of the artist, Pilar Corrias Gallery, Standard (Oslo)

Figures fall chaotically, cranes take flight, half-rendered dogs roam around threadbare computer-game landscapes. No matter how long you watch Ian Cheng‘s video installations, the logic of what‘s happening remains out of reach. The artist himself doesn‘t know how his simulations are going to turn out. He merely sets the parameters: a virtual ecosystem and characters whose actions are partly scripted and partly determined by chance. These works seem to circle around themselves, which raises several questions. Gianni Jetzer met up with the New York-based artist for an interview.

 Milk , 2014, oil, acrylic ink on canvas Courtesy of Elisabeth Wingate  

Milk, 2014, oil, acrylic ink on canvas
Courtesy of Elisabeth Wingate

 

In her collages from the beginning of the 1980s, Julia Wachtel made the image-worlds of Pop and trash collide. When she turned to painting, she remained loyal to her technique of hard cuts – which she has maintained ever since. Bob Nickas looks back on the era of infotainment, when picture-making was reinvented.

Curators talk about an artwork that is important to them and their work. Philippe Pirotte, Dean of the Städelschule and Director of Portikus in Frankfurt, on "Crystal Chain Letter Complex (Dark Episode)" (2005) by Corey McCorkle

 The Vision of Tondal Hieronymus Bosch (attributed)

The Vision of Tondal
Hieronymus Bosch (attributed)

Hieronymus Bosch's work hasn't just withstood the test of time; his paintings and illustrations currently on display at the Noordbranants Museum emerge from the archive with uncanny contemporaneity. Los Angeles based writer Dean Kissick puts Bosch's 500 year old esoterica into dialogue with a variety of images circulating our modern visual economy.

The American critic Bruce Hainley takes a photo of Justin Bieber losing his swag as the starting point for a reflection about the condition of art.

 Raf Simons, SS15 menswear

Raf Simons, SS15 menswear

A shirt, a T-shirt, a dress: clothing is inescapably concrete. But several recent collections have introduced new strategies of dematerialization into the world of fashion undoing the separation of image and object. Michele D’Aurizio explains.

 Stones to throw | 2011 | Installation, mail and public art project; painted stones, plinths, photographs, FedEx bills | views from streets of Diyarbakir | Courtesy of the artist | Photographs by Askin Ercan

Stones to throw | 2011 | Installation, mail and public art project; painted stones, plinths, photographs, FedEx bills | views from streets of Diyarbakir | Courtesy of the artist | Photographs by Askin Ercan

In November 2015, president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s AKP party unexpectedly won an outright election victory. Since then, activists, artists, academics, journalists and, indeed, anyone raising their voice to criticise government policy has faced persecution and arrests. We spoke to artist Ahmet Öğüt about the current situation of artists in Turkey and the limits of artistic protest.

 Still from Bitter Lake

Still from Bitter Lake

The best storyteller has the power, according to British filmmaker Adam Curtis. In his new BBC documentary Bitter Lake (2015) he montages archival material from seven decades of failed Afghan politics and explains why the West has lost faith in its own narratives.

 Photos: Marco Schibig, Kunsthalle Bern

Photos: Marco Schibig, Kunsthalle Bern

1997 eröffnete die Kunsthalle Bern “Blues and the Abstract Truth”, eine Einzelausstellung des US-amerikanischen Künstlers David Hammons. Der damals 54-Jährige richtete mit sparsamen Mitteln eine “unverkäufliche” Ausstellung ein: “Die Leute sollten nicht glauben, dass man irgendetwas nach Hause nehmen könnte.” (Hammons). Im Rückblick erschließen sich weitere Bedeutungen dieser Ausstellung, die im Moment des Besuchs vor allem durch ihre Atmosphäre beeindruckte, wie Daniel Baumann schreibt.

  Fatima Al Qadiri - Brute LP/CD

Fatima Al Qadiri
photo: Camille Blake

Fatima Al Qadiri in conversation with Daniel Keller

 The documenta team: Peter Iden, Arnold Bode, Harald Szeemann, Bazon Brock, Jean-Christophe Ammann, Ingolf Bauer Photo: © documenta Archiv

The documenta team: Peter Iden, Arnold Bode, Harald Szeemann, Bazon Brock, Jean-Christophe Ammann, Ingolf Bauer
Photo: © documenta Archiv

Harald Szeemann’s documenta 5 is considered one the most important exhibitions in the history of art. But hardly anyone is familiar with its original concept, which, in the spirit of May 1968, turned radically against art as something you could own. Instead of the art object, the collective event took centre stage. Bazon Brock, who worked with Szeemann on the project, talks about the exhibition that could have been.

 I Am Sion Sono!! Forum 2016 JPN 1984 von: Sion Sono

I Am Sion Sono!!
Forum 2016
JPN 1984
von: Sion Sono

Der Regisseur Max Linz findet die Vorgänger von Trecartin und Snapchat.

 All Images: REVITAL COHEN & TUUR VAN BALEN Precious metals and stones were mined out of technological objects and transformed back into mineral form. The artificial ore was constructed out of gold (Au), copper (Cu), Aluminum (Al), and whetstone; all taken from tools, machinery and computers that were sourced from a recently bankrupt factory. 

All Images:

REVITAL COHEN & TUUR VAN BALEN

H / AlCuTaAu, 2014

Precious metals and stones were mined out of technological objects and transformed back into mineral form. The artificial ore was constructed out of gold (Au), copper (Cu), Aluminum (Al), and whetstone; all taken from tools, machinery and computers that were sourced from a recently bankrupt factory. 

Even if the virtual space of the screen misleadingly suggests a kind of perpetual present, the world is filled with remainders of bygone media technologies. For the Finnish new media theorist Jussi Parikka, the multiple temporalities of media archaeology offer an alternative to the singular forward drive of accelerationism.

 5000 Feet is the Best, 2011 Digitalfilm / Digital film, 30 min.

5000 Feet is the Best, 2011 Digitalfilm / Digital film, 30 min.

The perfectly crafted, deeply unsettling films of Omer Fast revolve around the traumatic experiences of refugees, soldiers returning home from war and drone pilots. In a constant interplay of immersion and alienation, they turn filmic illusion against itself.

 Installation View  Portikus  Frankfurt am Main 2013  Photo: Helena Schlichting Courtesy Portikus 

Installation View Portikus
Frankfurt am Main 2013 
Photo: Helena Schlichting Courtesy Portikus 

Poignant eulogies, black feminist humor and expansive installations that ardently express openness, empathy and humaneness. Californian artist Lutz Bacher dodges a signature style in favor of artistic rebelliousness.

Alexander Scrimgeour talks to Ben Vickers about networks and institutions, new community-based social models, and the London post-Internet scene.

 Nobutaka Aozaki, Value Added 240950 (Del Monte whole kernel corn no salt added) , 2012 Canned corn and receipts

Nobutaka Aozaki, Value Added 240950 (Del Monte whole kernel corn no salt added), 2012
Canned corn and receipts

What if you can’t see an event? First of all, it doesn’t matter: anthropocentrism is out and it’s time we accepted that there are events that have nothing to do with humans being around to witness them. Benjamin H. Bratton talks about Google’s Nest, buying a can of corn in the supermarket, and the big question of scale.

 _______INSERT_______  

Puppies Puppies @ Freddy

 

Tucked away in one of California’s scenic national parks, Paul McCarthy inflated his giant butt plug (sculpture) and Stefan Simchowitz shaved his head. Take a walk with Keith J. Varadi around the third and final installment of the Paramount Ranch art fair.

 Hans Haacke Condensation Cube , 1963–65 © Generali Foundation / VBK, Wien 2013 Photo: Werner Kaligofs

Hans Haacke
Condensation Cube
1963–65
© Generali Foundation / VBK, Wien 2013
Photo: Werner Kaligofs

One of the fundamental questions of our 21st Century Theory series is whether the “correlationist thinking dominant today may perhaps be an obstacle to understanding important trends in contemporary art.”

 Alfred Johansen Untitled , 1966 Silver gelatin prints Courtesy Alfred Johansen Estate, Odense

Alfred Johansen
Untitled, 1966
Silver gelatin prints
Courtesy Alfred Johansen Estate, Odense

 Paul Kneale, Bump Bump, 2015 Inkjet print on canvas Courtesy of the Artist and Artuner

Paul Kneale, Bump Bump, 2015
Inkjet print on canvas
Courtesy of the Artist and Artuner

Why is taking a digital image more like painting than analogue photography? Media artist Paul Kneale investigates the fundamental difference between the two modes of production, and sees us as painters stepping back to review the latest brushstrokes of our just-taken selfies. Looking through the haze of his own “optical migraines” Kneale argues for a new form of painting.

 Installation view "Temporama", MAM Rio, 2015 Photo: Paulo Jabur

Installation view
"Temporama", MAM Rio, 2015
Photo: Paulo Jabur

Since the mid-1980s, the French artist Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster has created films, photographs, installations and environments that often involve viewers in uncanny, oneiric scenarios from the past and future. Most recently, she has been working on a series of performances where she assumes the roles of people such as King Ludwig II, Bob Dylan, Vera Nabokov and Fitzcarraldo. In advance of the opening of her retrospective at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, she talked to Oliver Basciano about mixing up different times, meeting ghosts, and why she works against the theatre.

 Student postest at Cooper Union

Student protest at Cooper Union

Status Quo Art School. How do art academies change in the course of a world run by a liberal-minded creative industries? How should art schools respond to the financialisation of higher education? Can art schools maintain their autonomy as sites of independent teaching and learning? In the first of a series of pieces tackling the future of art education to be published on Spike Online in the coming months, Chloe Stead writes on the student activists of Free Cooper Union and on protest as a learning experience.

 O.T ., 2007 Paper maché, paint, metal All images: Courtesy Galerie Meyer Kainer Foto: Atelier West

O.T., 2007
Paper maché, paint, metal
All images: Courtesy Galerie Meyer Kainer
Foto: Atelier West

How does art come into being? Is it developed deliberately, or is the artist a henchman of demand? An interview by Andreas Reiter Raabe

 Marina Abramović, Crystal Cinema

Marina Abramović, Crystal Cinema

 All images contributed by Darren Bader

All images contributed by Darren Bader 

"Shelf life is always an issue – I don’t like seeing the grapefruits wizen", commented American artist Darren Bader
in an email-conversation with critic Bruce Hainley. On food in the arts, Zeitgeist, and the profundity of ancient and
bad curators.

 AP News

AP News

It’s difficult to say what Tobias Madison actually does. The Swiss artist shuttles between refusal and participation, withdrawal and exposure, community spirit and calculated outsourcing. In doing so, he works his way along the edges of found formats: the work, the exhibition, as well as the figure of the “young” artist.

 From left to right: Alexander Scrimgeour, Contant Dullaart and Toke Lykkeberg. Photo: Rita Vitorelli

From left to right: Alexander Scrimgeour, Contant Dullaart and Toke Lykkeberg.
Photo: Rita Vitorelli

The artist Constant Dullaart has a dream to come true. Curator Toke Lykkeberg wants to show the world how it really is. One has founded a company, the other has brought an everyday commercial aesthetic into the Musée d’Art Modern de la Ville de Paris. What role do artists play in start-up culture? Are we experiencing a rematerialisation of the art object?

 Werner Herzog, Screenshots from Cave of Forgotton Dremas , 2010, 90 min.

Werner Herzog, Screenshots from Cave of Forgotton Dremas, 2010, 90 min.

In 2010, Werner Herzog was among the lucky few to be given permission to enter the recently rediscovered Chauvet Cave in the south of France. In just six days he made a stunning documentary film about its 32,000-year-old cave paintings. Timo Feldhaus looks back at the beginnings of art through a flat Retina Display and soon drifts back to the present – to the image archives of Corbis.

 I am an artwork and I am 3 years old ,  2004 Acrylic paint on wall and box Courtesy die Künstlerin und kaufmann repetto, Milan/New York

I am an artwork and I am 3 years old, 2004, acrylic paint on wall and box
Courtesy die Künstlerin und kaufmann repetto, Milan/New York

Lily van der Stokker's wall paintings and installations play on the decorative, the “nice” and the “girly”. Gossip, celebrity friends, and the always-dirty home find a place on the museum's walls, which become a diary full of colourful flowers and clouds. In this way, the artist has developed not only her own approach to image and text but also a feminist strategy: “Nonshouting Feminism” as she calls it.

 Portrait Nicolas Party Photo: Christophe Coënon

Portrait Nicolas Party
Photo: Christophe Coënon

“If you sit on an elephant, your behaviour changes.” Technology may continue to advance, but that doesn’t mean art is getting any better, says Nicolas Party. With a calm and irony-free attitude, he has been developing one of the most idiosyncratic practices among young painters today. A conversation with Rita Vitorelli about naivety, the slowness of matter, and what’s special about the human hand.

 Spike Berlin, 2015

Spike Berlin, 2015

It has become an all too common cliché that everyone from brokers to Uber drivers is employed under the model of the artist. Over and over, you hear that the boundaries between art, pop, and creative industries are blurring. What sets the artist apart from the non-artist? What sets the art object apart from other objects? A discussion with artists Natascha Sadr Haghighian and Simon Denny, and exhibition maker and gallerist Alexander Koch, moderated by Kolja Reichert.

 QUASI UNA Spirale, 2008 Acryl auf Leinwand / Acrylic on canvas, 182 x 154 cm Courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York Photo: Jean Vong

Quasi Una Spirale, 2008
Acrylic on canvas
Courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York
Photo: Jean Vong

Why are people now taking a renewed interest in Giorgio Griffa’s work? Perhaps because around 1970 he had already anticipated many of the concerns of painting today, with his serial gestures and unprimed canvases nailed onto the wall. Eva Fabbris writes about how the artist developed a unique position between Conceptual art and Arte Povera.

All five of the artists I’ve chosen have great personal and artistic significance for me. Except for Leonore Mau, I’ve worked with all of them in various ways, engaged with their work for years, and learned a lot from them in a lively and ongoing process of exchange. In selecting them, I’ve been guided above all by two thoughts: how can one relate to situations and objects so that there is an exchange among things, people, and world? And what might an art look like that speaks creole, non-Eurocentric languages?

 Still from Sponge Bob Square Pants

Still from Sponge Bob Square Pants

Spike’s current editorial intern is angry. The art world doesn't pay its assistants and interns, so in her other life Chloe Stead serves burgers. She has found allies in artists and activists who oppose the culture of unpaid work and calls on us all to do the same.

Can hackers really save lives? A member of Ghost Security Group speaks to our writer Paul Feigelfeld. By passing on information to the US secret services, the volunteer network brings a new mentality to hacktivism. Read the full interview here:

 Lady Bunny and RuPaul

Lady Bunny and RuPaul

Originally envisioned as a survey show of emerging artists, the fourth instalment of “Greater New York” at MoMA PS1 changes tract and raises the average artist age to a getting-on-a-bit 48. Through the more mature positions the difference between old New York and the “Post-Bloomburg iteration we’ve inherited” becomes startlingly clear. Musing on the inclusion of videos of drag performers by Nelson Sullivan and the cruising photographs of Alvin Baltrop, our writer gets nostalgic for the salad days of NYC.

 Photo: Zoë Fisher

Photo: Zoë Fisher

Is it still possible to forget?

 Albert Oehlen, Rennkostüm , 2001 Inkjet print, computer painting on paper Courtesy the artist

Albert Oehlen, Rennkostüm, 2001
Inkjet print, computer painting on paper
Courtesy the artist

Artists’ assistants are omnipresent in the art business. Yet, as a rule, they are all but invisible. Ever nameless they disappear from view in artists’ studios; their work is absorbed into their employers’ production and their independent creative participation in the works is subsumed by the artistic “brand” they have helped to form. However, things do seem to be changing. Not only has “Artist’s Assistant” become a recognized occupation, but assistants are starting to emerge from their anonymity and raising their profiles as artists in their own right. Hans-Jürgen Hafner sketches out the situation.

 Beauty and the Beast , 1991,   film still 

Beauty and the Beast, 1991, film still 

If 72% of 18 to 25-year-olds say they can express their feelings better though using emojis than words what does that mean for the future of written language? Dean Kissick discuses Starbucks conspiracy theories, ordering Domino’s pizza and if heartbreak can be conveyed by pictures of anthropomorphic food.

 Art Club 2000, Untitled (Times Square / Gap Grunge 1), 1992-1993, C-Print  

Art Club 2000, Untitled (Times Square / Gap Grunge 1), 1992-1993, C-Print

 

Rrose Sélavy, Vern Blosum, John Dogg: Why do artists create alter egos or hide as collectives behind made-up characters? Martin Herbert traces the figure of the fictional artist over the last hundred years and discovers a reflection of the art world’s changing face. Sometimes one identity just isn’t enough.

How do digital images change painting?

 Ericka Beckman, Hiatus ,1999/2015, 16mm/HD, colour, sound, dual screen  

Ericka Beckman, Hiatus, 1999/2015, 16mm/HD, colour, sound, dual screen  

The artist Ericka Beckman has been dealing with gender tropes in virtual worlds for over 20 years and pre-empting many contemporary discussions on the topic. With current debates about feminism raging online our writer finds that it’s the perfect time to revisit the CalArts MFA’s oeuvre who presented her characters as subjects in a form of techno-Bildungsroman.

 SPIKE BERLIN, 6 pm Marcus Geiger, Untitled, Table , 2006–2014 Tabletop, 2 wooden trestles, 4 chairs, felt carpet

SPIKE BERLIN, 6 pm
Marcus Geiger, Untitled, Table, 2006–2014
Tabletop, 2 wooden trestles, 4 chairs, felt carpet

Why does the art of today often seem to exist in a historical vacuum? What is the significance of art history for post-Internet art? Is our sense of history changing because of the accelerated circulation of images, money and data? Where does this leave the art object? At Spike’s new space in Berlin, Kolja Reichert moderated a discussion between artist and essayist Hito Steyerl, art historian Susanne von Falkenhausen, and two of the four curators of the 2016 Berlin Biennial: Lauren Boyle and Marco Roso from the collective DIS.

 Knight Landesman, Photo: David Levene for the Guardian

Knight Landesman, Photo: David Levene for the Guardian

Frieze Projects, Frieze Talks, Frieze Sounds and the Frieze Artist award: over the past few years Frieze Art Fair proper has grown to incorporate a full range of non-for-profit projects and events. But isn't that missing the point? Our writer remembers what Frieze is really about.

 Installation view "KAYA V," Galerie Meyer Kainer, Vienna 2014 Courtesy Galerie Meyer Kainer Photo: Uli Holz

Installation view 
Kerstin Brätsch and Debo Eilers, KAYA V, curated_by N.O.Madski, Vienna 2015 
Courtesy Galerie Meyer Kainer
Photo: Uli Holz

This years "curated_by vienna" addresses artistic strategies for a post capitalist era of perpetual crisis. From Bitcoin, to backroom selling, our writer explores what "Tomorrow is now" has to offer.

Matias Faldbakken, born in 1973, first became known as a writer, thanks to his 2001 novel The Cocka Hola Company, which inaugurated the »Scandinavian Misanthropy« trilogy. The open social critique in his writing is counterbalanced by the deliberate hermeticism of his art, in which found materials are worked into what the artist calls »negativistic gestures« in versions of sculpture, readymade, and painting. His works often use materials from construction or logistics, as in a recent series of flattened and framed cardboard boxes. The »aesthetic products« in his exhibitions are, Faldbakken has said, »the side effects of an artistic strategy that engages readily available possibilities of disengagement«.Here he selects five artists and writers whose work he admires.

 Installation view, Reto Pulfer,  Dehydrierte Landschaft des Zustands , 2015, photo: Xaver von Cranach

Installation view, Reto Pulfer, Dehydrierte Landschaft des Zustands, 2015, photo: Xaver von Cranach

Taking place at Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin "Technosphere, Now" was the inaugural event of a four-year research project into global technology and its identity. Our writer visited the one-day conference, thought about Berghain and water on Mars, and was left with some answers and a lot of questions.

 Still from Józef Robakowski, Moscow, 1986.   

Still from Józef Robakowski, Moscow, 1986. Lokal_30 gallery.

 


Spike’s editor at large went to Warsaw Gallery Weekend and picked out a few of the art experiences in the city’s galleries and institutions that helped make his trip worthwhile.

 Iki Nakagawa, video still, courtesy of The Kitchen

Iki Nakagawa, video still, courtesy of the Kitchen

With his new book the author attempts to turn the “trance” of everyday life pink. While introducing it in New York’s The Kitchen the American poet also played the piano.

 Mass murder , Installation view; Blue Room, Night Gallery, Los Angeles 2014

Mass murder, Installation view; Blue Room, Night Gallery, Los Angeles 2014

Samara Golden‘s phantasmagoric installations bring to mind the halls of mirrors in old amusement parks as well as the dark glamour of Hollywood. On the occasion of the Los Angeles–based artist‘s exhibition at MoMA PS1, Dorothée Dupuis explores the uncanny power of Golden‘s work and discovers a form of resistance in the emotions conjured up by the shimmering interiors of the American home.

 Shanzhai Biennial No. 1 , Beijing Design Week, 2012, mixed media

Shanzhai Biennial No. 1, Beijing Design Week, 2012, mixed media

Questions of appropriation have never been easy, but the New York-based artists collective Shanzhai Biennial uses the strategy of the copy – or, better, a copy of the strategy – as a way of refusing easy categorization, whether as parody, masquerade, parasitism, critique, or something else. Their work raises questions about the spectacle, globalization, branding, and, as Harry Burke argues, compels us to reconsider the relationship between art and image.

How has the internet changed the nature of the event?

I’m terrible with these favorites’ lists, but I do have admiration for these artists and I’m sure one doesn’t have to look too far or too deep to see their traces on my thinking.

 Eating the Wall Street Journal (3rd version) , 2000, Mixed media installation with performance, SculptureCenter New York

Eating the Wall Street Journal (3rd version), 2000, Mixed media installation with performance, SculptureCenter New York

Whether calling himself “The Friendliest Black Artist in America”, eating the Wall Street Journal piece by piece, or crawling up the entirety of New York’s Broadway, the American artist William Pope.L applies pressure in exactly those places where race and capitalism meet in the American unconscious. Adrienne Edwards writes on Pope.L‘s strategies of abjection, precarity, and play.

 Karl Owe Knausgaard

Portrait of Karl Owe Knausgaard by André Løyning

If we assume that we always get what we deserve, there's nothing for it but to read Karl Owe Knausgaard's novels. They are long and very boring and a perfect expression of our times. Timo Feldhaus read the new volume of "My Struggle".

 Venus’s Flower Basket  (Euplectella aspergillum)

Venus’s Flower Basket  (Euplectella aspergillum)

Voluminous and heavy, a new anthology brings together 37 texts on speculative realism and its ramifications on the arts by the likes of Quentin Meillassoux, Graham Harman, Steven Shaviro, Manuel DeLanda, Diedrich Diederichsen, Reza Negarestani, and many more. Paul Feigelfeld wades through and finds an overly present absolute, and philosophy that has become a tourist attraction.

The photographs of the young Polish artist reflect the conditions of selfhood in the era of the Instagram. Within a spectrum of mistakes, she discovers the tender, vulnerable body.

 Dawn of the dead, filmstill, 1978

Dawn of the dead, filmstill, 1978

Contemporary abstraction borrows blindly from art history, all looks the same and works particularly well if you hang it over the sofa - this is the reproach at the heart of Walter Robinson's idea of "zombie formalism". But maybe art criticism has just forgotten how to look closely. Travis Jeppesen defends abstract painting against its opponents and hits the ball back into their court: it's time for critics to reengage with their subjects and find a new language for painting.

De-evolution against the existential terror of everyday life is still trending. The designer Thomas Thwaites commissioned a set of special prosthetics and decided to spend a couple of days living as a goat. His experiment makes Dean Kissick think about modern communication, the Paleo diet, ancient satyrs, and Miley Cyrus.

 Still from Rihanna’s intentionally controversial video “BBHMM”

Still from Rihanna’s intentionally controversial video “BBHMM”

From Donald Trump to Rihanna, True Detective, and 50 Cent: this summer a new theatricality has become evident in American culture. The congruence of camp and violence has given us Young Thug, a rapper who calls his guns “dicks” for reasons nobody knows.

 The Dadaists audience: themselves,  Berlin 1920 Opening with Hannah Höch, Otto Schmalhausen, Raoul Hausmann, John Heartfield mit Kind, Otto Burchard, Margarete und Wieland Herzfelde, Rudolf Schlichter, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (?), Unbekannt und Johannes Baader

The Dadaists audience: themselves, Berlin 1920

Opening with Hannah Höch, Otto Schmalhausen, Raoul Hausmann, John Heartfield mit Kind, Otto Burchard, Margarete und Wieland Herzfelde, Rudolf Schlichter, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (?), Unbekannt und Johannes Baader

The field of art is considered to be free, open and accessible to everyone. In reality, no outsiders have been spotted here for a long time. Does “art audience” today really only mean people who have an (economic) interest in the art world? Is anyone immune to the half-drunk advances of its warped social economy? Are we all alone? With these questions in mind, our reporter Elvia Wilk went from Berlin to Venice to the hotspots of this summer's art viewing and asked people.

 Photo: Vae Vae Chan

Photo: Vae Vae Chan

With his denim installations, colourful body paintings, and dreamy videos, Korakrit Arunanondchai has achieved a quick and controversial success on the art world's stage. By Harry Burke.

The biggest news of the month is that Google has developed an Artificial Intelligence that is able to paint. The artist Daniel Keller tried it out. In the process, he discovered two things: a Post-Internet art of hallucinogens and an answer to the question of why visual memes can so quickly go from mindblowing to lame.

 "Untitled", 2012; Oil, paper on canvas, 230 x 180 cm

"Untitled", 2012; Oil, paper on canvas, 230 x 180 cm; © Albert Oehlen, Courtesy Gagosian Gallery; Photo: Lothar Schnepf

Like almost no other artist, Albert Oehlen subjects painting to a stress test. For over 30 years he’s been tinkering with the medium’s source code: colour and paint application, lines and layers, titles and triumphs, disappointments and expectations. These elements are all played against one another and caught off guard. Daniel Baumann leads us through the work.

 Guy Debord, Michèle Bernstein & Asgar Jorn, 1961

Guy Debord, Michèle Bernstein & Asgar Jorn, 1961

In 1957 a group of artists, poets, and filmmakers founded the Situationist International in Paris. Michèle Bernstein was one of the few women among them. She wrote the novel All the King’s Horses in 1960 – when she was married to the group’s leading theorist Guy Debord – as a way of filling the young organisation’s coffers. This sentimental romance about the affairs of Parisian intellectuals was a pastiche of Françoise Sagan’s Bonjour Tristesse and became a bestseller. Christian Egger writes on the book, which was recently translated into German.

 Exhibition View Future Light: Escaping Transparency, MAK Exhibition Hall in the front: Bik Van der Pol, How Does a Straight Line Feel?, 2015 © Peter Kainz /MAK

Exhibition View
Future Light: Escaping Transparency, MAK Exhibition Hall
in the front: Bik Van der Pol, How Does a Straight Line Feel?, 2015
© Peter Kainz /MAK

The first Vienna Biennale aims to combine art, design, and architecture to generate creative ideas and artistic projects that help improve the world's problems. Maybe it wants too much. Our author puzzles over the problems of the event itself.

 Drawing by Dan Perjovich for Spike

Drawing by Dan Perjovich for Spike

Many people are anxious that the growing class divide in the art world and the succession of record-breaking prices paid for contemporary art endanger the belief system supporting it. But why is nobody worried about money itself? Isn’t what happens at an auction that money celebrates its freedom, its release from the burden of being a means of comparison? Is art the new money? On a currency that lives from the bank of the gaze, into which we all make payments.

 Walter Pichler, TV-Helm (Tragbares Wohnzimmer); Courtesy: Contemporary Fine Arts

Walter Pichler, TV-helmet (portable living room), 1967; Courtesy: Contemporary Fine Arts, Berlin

When the Vienna Actionists urinated, masturbated, and vomited at an event titled “Art and Revolution” in Vienna University’s Lecture Hall 1 in 1968, the proceedings were accompanied by a lecture on the relationship between speech and thought by the then thirty-two-year-old Oswald Wiener. One year later his literary montage die verbesserung von mitteleuropa, roman (the improvement of central europe, a novel) was published. With its excurses on linguistics and cybernetics, it now reads as an astonishing foreshadowing of the Internet and virtual reality. Later, Wiener turned to the figure of the dandy, who maintains his difference from machines by cultivating a practice of self-observation. Hans-Christian Dany visited him at his home in southeast Austria to talk about the peculiar standstill of art and science in the digital age.

 Drawing by Jaakko Pallasvuo   

Drawing by Jaakko Pallasvuo 

 

In the past decade we've seen art flow and exponentially overflow through information networks. Pallasvuo's years as a practicing artist have overlapped with the peak years of sharing culture. Now he just wants to shut the fuck up.

 Congregation by Chloe Dewe Mathews  

Congregation by Chloe Dewe Mathews

 

Writing about art never happens in isolation. In his latest column from London, Oliver Basciano drops the facade that does. This time the critic has serious problems with his house. He saw three exhibitions in Peckham but couldn't resist thinking about DIY.

 "There and Back“, Skånes Konstförening, Malmö 2010

"There and Back“, Skånes Konstförening, Malmö 2010

Portrait Christian Falsnaes

 © Bart Nagel, 1999

© Bart Nagel, 1999

Interview Terre Thaemlitz

 BMW Tate Live 2015 – "If Tate Modern was Musée de la danse?" Olivia Hemingway ©Tate Photography

BMW Tate Live 2015 – "If Tate Modern was Musée de la danse?" Olivia Hemingway ©Tate Photography

Last weekend, dancer and choreographer Boris Charmatz hypothetically transformed Tate Modern into Musée de la danse. Our editor-at-large was harbouring some reservations about this new democratic participatory art, but found it surprisingly moving.

 Gavin Brown (links) und Daniel Baumann (rechts)

Gavin Brown (links) und Daniel Baumann (rechts)

The New York-based gallerist Gavin Brown and the Swiss curator Daniel Baumann take a shot at an unromantic view of the art market. It turns out depressing, entertaining, and instructive at once.

 Photo: Johannes Worsøe Berg

Photo: Johannes Worsøe Berg

The New York-based Norwegian artist is drawn to big subjects – violence, sexuality, destruction, aging, self-expression. His exhibitions are dense installations packed with paintings, sculptures, readymades, photographs, and contributions from friends working with art, design, or literature. Jennifer Krasinski speaks to him about the visual dimension of writing, the death drive in homosexuality, and the irrelevance of cultural relevance.

 Kathy Acker at 26th Studio, New York 1990

Kathy Acker at 26th Studio, New York 1990
Photo: Michel Delsol

Chris Kraus writes about the renewal of interest in this controversial punk icon.

A Pamphlet for Talking in front of Art

 Moussa Ag Assarid & Mazou Ibrahim Touré, Photo by Lidia Rossner

Moussa Ag Assarid & Mazou Ibrahim Touré; Photo by Lidia Rossner

The National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad

 Untitled, 2013 Flashe, acrylic, and oil on linen 349 x 305 cm

Untitled, 2013
Flashe, acrylic, and oil on linen
349 x 305 cm

Known as much for her clever plunder of painting’s conventions as for her bumptious mix of high and low cultural references, Los-Angeles painter Laura Owens has by now long outpaced the early trivializations of her work as light-hearted California-girl pictures. In her recent work, Owens gives painting’s gestures her most serious overhaul to date.

 AA Bronson & Ryan Brewer Red 2011

AA Bronson & Ryan Brewer
Red
2011

Writing about art never happens in isolation. Oliver Basciano drops the façade that it does. In London, the critic visits his sick grandmother and three exhibitions that both do and do not match the emotional heights of all that happens outside the gallery walls.

 Heimo Zobernig Photo: Lukas Gansterer

Heimo Zobernig
Photo: Lukas Gansterer

The endless talk about context is eating up art. While preparing for the Austrian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale, Zobernig speaks with Daniel Baumann about his career and the ideal artist.

 Cashmere Sweeter: Dan Bodan, die große Berliner Hoffnung  

Cashmere Sweeter: Dan Bodan, Berlin’s next big hope

Berlin Special: Stream of Consciousness about Berlin art scene that makes theory become lifestyle.

 Piotr Uklanski & Hermann Nitsch Photo: Wolfgang Thaler

Piotr Uklanski & Hermann Nitsch
Photo: Wolfgang Thaler

The legendary Austrian artist speaks about the similarities between art and religion and the nature of being.

 Paul Kneale Still from  SEO and Co , 2014 Digital video, 30 min., looped From left to right: Oscar Khan, Harry Burke, Nina Cristante  

Paul Kneale
Still from SEO and Co, 2014
Digital video, 30 min., looped
From left to right: Oscar Khan, Harry Burke, Nina Cristante

 

“Generation Wuss” only wants to be liked, is incapable of dealing with criticism, and takes everything too seriously – this was the gist of a recent piece by Bret Easton Ellis in Vanity Fair. Responding to this no-holds-barred attack on today‘s twenty-somethings, the writer Harry Burke comes to his generation’s defence.

 Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Philipp Harth, Pablo Picasso; © bpk / Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Zentralarchiv

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Philipp Harth, Pablo Picasso; © bpk / Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Zentralarchiv

Are the origins of the museum of contemporary art perhaps to be found in Berlin?

 Movie Star Maps, 2014 Detail of room-sized mural installation, Los Feliz, California Photo: Michael Underwood

Movie Star Maps, 2014
Detail of room-sized mural installation, Los Feliz, California
Photo: Michael Underwood

Alex Israel was born in Los Angeles in 1982. His practice is multi-faceted, employing a variety of media to accommodate the many and varied flavors of his particular West Coast aesthetic. His blown-up sun shades, airbrushed self-portraits, and Hollywood props belie a deeply layered set of personal and pop cultural references that expertly reorient their context. His As It LAys series of celebrity interviews reflect the miracle and wonder that is life in L.A. and helped to bring a greater attention to his sun-drenched artworks. Since 2010 he has operated a sunglasses company called Freeway Eyewear that has lately begun collaborating with marquee artists to design new looks. The next collaboration is scheduled for release this holiday season. Israel is an unvaryingly upbeat artist, consistently delivering a cool optimism across his oeuvre. What is his secret? An interview by Jon Leon.

 Levi Hicks  

Levi Hicks

 

Curators Daniel Baumann and Jay Sander confess their secret love for the museum, discuss the (alleged?) power of the collector, and the reawakened interest in performance. Withholding that the latter’s successful combination of popular event with a claim to art is what makes it so attractive to museums. In 2012, Jay Sanders co-curated the Whitney Biennial together with Elisabeth Sussman. Daniel Baumann is one of the curators of this year’s Carnegie International in Pittsburgh.

 The Force The Movie The Vague, mit Kööt Juurak CIAP, Hasselt 2011

The Force The Movie The Vague, mit Kööt Juurak
CIAP, Hasselt 2011

In the last years, the art world fell in love with live and time-based practices. Since then, a lot has been said and written about performance and performativity, but too little time has been given to listen to those whose work has been stretching the tight disciplinary confinements that shape dance, performance and visual arts. That is what Filipa Ramos sought to do in asking the Swedish performance-related artist-dancer-choreographer-producer-writer Mårten Spångberg to give us his thoughts on four concepts: Space, Rhythm, Expectation and Embodiment. The result of this encounter can hardly be described, as ideas, concepts and words sprang out all over the place without restraint and with such overwhelming speed that capturing it in writing was a performative feat in itself.

 Autarchy, 2010 Verschiedene Materialien Foto: Studio Formafantasma

Autarchy, 2010
Mixed media
Photo: Studio Formafantasma

Mining the traditional ideal that design is the servant of industry, Eindhoven-based Studio Formafantasma is giving shape to the future of things.

 Kodak, 2006  Alle Abbildungen: © Tacita Dean, Courtesy Marian Goodman Gallery, Paris/New York, Frith Street Gallery, London

Kodak, 2006 
All images: © Tacita Dean, Courtesy Marian Goodman Gallery, Paris/New York, Frith Street Gallery, London

The British artist, who is currently showing at Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall, is known for her series of film portraits of famous men, including Merce Cunningham, Mario Merz, Michael Hamburger and Giorgio Morandi. Andreas Reiter Raabe talks to her about painterly qualities, light, colour and affection.

 Pieter Bruegel the older, The Land of Cockaigne, 1567 Oil on wood, 52 x 78 cm

Pieter Bruegel the older, The Land of Cockaigne, 1567
Oil on wood, 52 x 78 cm

Martin Kippenberger’s idea of an art that reflects its social conditions has evolved into an art world that integrates everything. What happens when the work dissolves into its context and the form of the work becomes a form of life?

 Installationansicht »Bernadette Corporation: 2000 Wasted Years« Artists Space, New York, 2012.  Foto: Daniel Pérez

Installation view, »Bernadette Corporation: 2000 Wasted Years«, Artists Space, New York 
Photo: Daniel Pérez

A sprawling, multi-panel chronology of Bernadette Corporation’s history included in their current retrospective at Artists Space pinpoints their formation in SoHo in 1993 as the initiative of one »Bernadette« and some others active in the neighborhood club culture.

 Stonewall 3, 2002  

Stonewall 3, 2002

 

Art as Architectural Critique: Monica Bonvicini’s installations of chains, metal bars and glass boxes are an attack on the phallocentrism and latent violence of modernist concepts of ordering and planning. In this interview with Jennifer Allen the artist talks about the relationship between architecture and sexuality and dismantles some of the myths surrounding her work

 The land foundation, Chiang Mai, Thailand, Courtesy neugerriemschneider, Berlin, Photo: Liz Linden  

The land foundation, Chiang Mai, Thailand, Courtesy neugerriemschneider, Berlin, Photo: Liz Linden

 

He has become famous as a »cooking artist« – a misunderstanding that has almost concealed the real questions raised by his work for the past twenty years. Via email, Raimar Stange spoke with Rirkrit Tiravanija about this subject and the always-surprising way that the artist has read Western culture against the cultural attitudes of his homeland, Thailand.

 »Corporate Video Decisions«, 2011, exhibition view, Friedrich Petzel Gallery, New York Courtesy of the artist and Friedrich Petzel Gallery, New York

»Corporate Video Decisions«, 2011, exhibition view, Friedrich Petzel Gallery, New York
Courtesy of the artist and Friedrich Petzel Gallery, New York

At what point does critique become collusion? Does the visualization of a network, a corporate ideology, or an advertising slogan assimilate the viewer into its logic? Critical and complicit by turns, Simon Denny works with academics, corporate entities, and re-found institutions, as well as with artists then and now. His installations archive, subsume and re-visualize their structures and methodologies. Pablo Larios explores how the Berlin-based, New Zealand-born artist reformulates questions of form and representation in his material excavations of current paranoia and progress.

Harmony Korine’s film, Spring Breakers, is an antidote to The Hangover and other boys-will-be-boys movies with hearts of gold. A chick flick from hell, it captures a sense of post-political terror.

 »Each Memory Recalled Must Do Some Violence to its Origins«, undisclosed location Exterior view

»Each Memory Recalled Must Do Some Violence to its Origins«, undisclosed location
Exterior view

Aaron Moulton has been curator of the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art since 2012, where he recently initiated the Utah Biennial. He meets with Carson Chan Executive Curator of the Biennial of the Americas in Denver, to discuss the challenges of a regional context, the legacy of land-art, and collaborating with Mormons in the Mountain West.

 Sam Pulitzer »Nine Scarlet Eclipses for ›Them‹«, 2013 Installationsansicht, Lars Friedrich, Berlin Courtesy der Künstler und Lars Friedrich, Berlin. Foto: Simon Vogel

Sam Pulitzer »Nine Scarlet Eclipses for ›Them‹«, 2013
Installationsansicht, Lars Friedrich, Berlin
Courtesy der Künstler und Lars Friedrich, Berlin. Foto: Simon Vogel

Enough with end of the year best/worst rankings once again. There will always be more art than we can digest, shortening our attention spans, and causing our opinions to soften, broaden, become more compromising. The critic of exuberant homages and vitriolic damnings fades into the shadows, and who appears in their place? Not an apathetic voice, but a conflicted voice. Deconstructed and self-conscious yet loud and clear, and firmly present. Six curators and critics were invited to recall an exhibition that neither seduced nor repelled them but left them with an ambiguous verdict.

 Daniel Hoesl

Daniel Hoesl

The idiosyncratic, low-budget productions of Austrian filmmaker Daniel Hoesl narrate exemplary disruptions and upheavals with mischievous and post-heroic defiance of standardized milieus. Following eight shorts, Soldate Jeannette is the media arts graduate’s first feature-length film. The film, which has won international awards, revolves around two women, each running away from something, who meet at a countryside bowling alley: Fanni, who hails from the upper middle class, is broke and seeks to escape the strictures of a life ruled by money; Anna, the younger woman, can no longer bear the machismo on the farm.

 What Sort of Man Reads Playboy?, 2010-2012 Glitter, oil, collage on canvas 137,2 x 124,5 cm Photo: Moritz Frei © Chris Martin Courtesy of Chris Martin and KOW, Berlin

What Sort of Man Reads Playboy?, 2010-2012
Glitter, oil, collage on canvas
137,2 x 124,5 cm
Photo: Moritz Frei
© Chris Martin
Courtesy of Chris Martin and KOW, Berlin

It’s undeniable that Chris Martin’s paintings resemble »outsider art«. Yet I like them not for being intuitive, or spiritual, or liberated from convention – although they are all these things – but because they are affectionate.

 All images: Jordan Wolfson, (Female figure) 2014, 2014 Mixed media Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York/London Photo: John Smith

All images:
Jordan Wolfson, (Female figure) 2014, 2014
Mixed media
Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York/London
Photo: John Smith

For many visitors, Jordan Wolfson’s robot represents a first contact with the most technologically developed and also most disturbing robot they have ever seen. But can the gallery space do justice to the experience? After all, a robot is only as evil as the world into which it is placed.

 Aisha Khalid I am and I am not  (2017)

Aisha Khalid
I Am and I Am not (2017)

 © 2013 Untitled Rick Howard Company LLCC Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

© 2013 Untitled Rick Howard Company LLCC
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

As an antidote to shoot-em-up sci-fi fantasies that depict ravaged worlds where humans and computers co-exist the love story comes with the best intentions and captures the complicated sincerity of a truly post-digital world.