Timo Feldhaus

 Hund flieht aus Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

Hund flieht aus Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

Jeden zweiten Dienstag schreibt Timo Feldhaus über das Wichtigste auf der Welt: andere Leute.

 Armen Avanessian Photo: Dirk Skiba

Armen Avanessian
Photo: Dirk Skiba

How can theory have an effect on the world? Armen Avanessian’s answer would be: only by making it go faster. With books and conferences on Accelerationism and Specu­lative Realism, as well as his participation in an art film earlier this year, he has attempted to free philosophical thought from the narrow bounds of the academy and bring the Left up to speed with financial capital­ism. Why does he find the art world so appealing?

 Photo by Amalia Ulman

Photo by Amalia Ulman

What does it mean today to have a life with kids, to have a life in art, and to live a life? Why are children and the artist's life so hard to unite? Or is this a false assumption? Spike Art Daily dedicates a series of interviews to the problematic relationship that the art industry has with its offspring. In this interview Lauren Boyle and Marco Roso, two of the four members of DIS, talk about why the concept of family is just "too much for the art world" and the differences between raising kids in Berlin and New York.

Every Tuesday Timo Feldhaus writes about the most important thing in the world: other people.

 Werner Herzog, Screenshots from Cave of Forgotton Dremas , 2010, 90 min.

Werner Herzog, Screenshots from Cave of Forgotton Dremas, 2010, 90 min.

In 2010, Werner Herzog was among the lucky few to be given permission to enter the recently rediscovered Chauvet Cave in the south of France. In just six days he made a stunning documentary film about its 32,000-year-old cave paintings. Timo Feldhaus looks back at the beginnings of art through a flat Retina Display and soon drifts back to the present – to the image archives of Corbis.

 Photo: Alberto Gamazo

Photo: Alberto Gamazo

What does it mean today to have a life with kids, to have a life in art, and to live a life? Why are children and the artist's life so hard to unite? Or is this a false assumption? Spike Art Daily dedicates a series of interviews to the problematic relationship that the art industry has with its offspring. In this interview, curator and theorist Chus Martínez talks about shared realities, competitive situations and why children always open us up.

 Photo: Kate Young

Portrait of Jacob Appelbaum 

Photo: Kate Young

If the art world has the image of a non-transparent, nepotistic closed circle, what happens when hackers claim their place in it? And more importantly why go into art when you could hack the system?

Jacob Appelbaum, internet activist and journalist, played an important role in the publication of the Snowden documents and the revelation of the spied-on mobile phone of Chancellor Angela Merkel. The 33-years-old hacker talks with us about his first solo art exhibition in Berlin and why this city is a magnet for freedom fighters.

A Pamphlet for Talking in front of Art

 Foto von Heji Shin

What does it mean today to lead a life with a child, a life in art and a life as such? Why are children and life as an artist so difficult to reconcile? Or is that perhaps not true at all? In a series of interviews, Spike Art Daily is dedicating itself to the problematic relationship that the art world has with its children. We start with Isabelle Graw. The critic, professor, and editor of Texte zur Kunst explains why children sometimes even make it easier to oppose the logic of an economy that has it in for our lives.

 Noam in front of his dads sculpture 

Noam in front of his dads sculpture 

Harm van den Dorpel on "having kids in the art world"

 Cashmere Sweeter: Dan Bodan, die große Berliner Hoffnung  

Cashmere Sweeter: Dan Bodan, Berlin’s next big hope

Berlin Special: Stream of Consciousness about Berlin art scene that makes theory become lifestyle.

 CARSTEN HÖLLER Detail aus / from Aufzugbett, 2010 Photo: Mary Scherpe © Carsten Höller / Bildrecht Wien 2014

CARSTEN HÖLLER
Detail aus / from Aufzugbett, 2010 Photo: Mary Scherpe
© Carsten Höller / Bildrecht Wien 2014

During the summer months Timo Feldhaus visited major art events in Cologne, Vienna and Basel, as well as Berghain in Berlin. Everywhere he found the same things: a need for immediate bodily experience and intensity; viewers looking to art for kicks; exhibitions that made no effort at subtlety but sought to hit everyone openly in the gut; and a refashioned performance art, adapted to suit our daily compulsion to perform.

 All images: Jordan Wolfson, (Female figure) 2014, 2014 Mixed media Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York/London Photo: John Smith

All images:
Jordan Wolfson, (Female figure) 2014, 2014
Mixed media
Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York/London
Photo: John Smith

For many visitors, Jordan Wolfson’s robot represents a first contact with the most technologically developed and also most disturbing robot they have ever seen. But can the gallery space do justice to the experience? After all, a robot is only as evil as the world into which it is placed.