Martin Kippenberger

 Maria Lassnig Die Lebensqualität (Quality of Life), 2001, Oil on canvas, 195 cm x 205 cm © Maria Lassnig Stiftung / Foundation

Maria Lassnig
Die Lebensqualität (Quality of Life), 2001, Oil on canvas, 195 cm x 205 cm
© Maria Lassnig Stiftung / Foundation

 Christopher Williams Reinigung Ursula Schweyen, Lindenstr. 34, Köln, February 17th, 2010 2010 Silver Gelatin Print 86 x 95 cm (gerahmt) Courtesy Galerie Gisela Capitain, Köln

Christopher Williams
Reinigung Ursula Schweyen, Lindenstr. 34, Köln, February 17th, 2010
2010
Silver Gelatin Print
86 x 95 cm (gerahmt)
Courtesy Galerie Gisela Capitain, Köln

Where's the best Kuchen in Cologne? Where does the art world convene after hours? Which museums are worth a visit? And where are Martin Kippenberger's old haunts? Temporary Gallery's Regina Barunke serves it to us straight with her insider-guide for your trip to Art Cologne.

Daniel Richter, assistant to Albert Oehlen
Erfindung des guten Irrtums, 2013
Oil on canvas
Courtesy Contemporary Fine Arts, Berlin, © Bildrecht, Wien 2013
Photo: Jochen Littkemann, Berlin

Artists’ assistants are omnipresent in the art business. Yet, as a rule, they are all but invisible. Ever nameless they disappear from view in artists’ studios; their work is absorbed into their employers’ production and their independent creative participation in the works is subsumed by the artistic “brand” they have helped to form. However, things do seem to be changing. Not only has “Artist’s Assistant” become a recognized occupation, but assistants are starting to emerge from their anonymity and raising their profiles as artists in their own right. Hans-Jürgen Hafner sketches out the situation.

 "Untitled", 2012; Oil, paper on canvas, 230 x 180 cm

"Untitled", 2012; Oil, paper on canvas, 230 x 180 cm; © Albert Oehlen, Courtesy Gagosian Gallery; Photo: Lothar Schnepf

Like almost no other artist, Albert Oehlen subjects painting to a stress test. For over 30 years he’s been tinkering with the medium’s source code: colour and paint application, lines and layers, titles and triumphs, disappointments and expectations. These elements are all played against one another and caught off guard. Daniel Baumann leads us through the work.

 Pieter Bruegel the older, The Land of Cockaigne, 1567 Oil on wood, 52 x 78 cm

Pieter Bruegel the older, The Land of Cockaigne, 1567
Oil on wood, 52 x 78 cm

Martin Kippenberger’s idea of an art that reflects its social conditions has evolved into an art world that integrates everything. What happens when the work dissolves into its context and the form of the work becomes a form of life?