New York

 Archie Burnett

Archie Burnett

Dancer Archie Burnett, the first Father of the House of Ninja, talks about 45 years of Vogue and Waacking

 Photo by Amalia Ulman

Photo by Amalia Ulman

What does it mean today to have a life with kids, to have a life in art, and to live a life? Why are children and the artist's life so hard to unite? Or is this a false assumption? Spike Art Daily dedicates a series of interviews to the problematic relationship that the art industry has with its offspring. In this interview Lauren Boyle and Marco Roso, two of the four members of DIS, talk about why the concept of family is just "too much for the art world" and the differences between raising kids in Berlin and New York.

 I am an artwork and I am 3 years old ,  2004 Acrylic paint on wall and box Courtesy die Künstlerin und kaufmann repetto, Milan/New York

I am an artwork and I am 3 years old, 2004, acrylic paint on wall and box
Courtesy die Künstlerin und kaufmann repetto, Milan/New York

Lily van der Stokker's wall paintings and installations play on the decorative, the “nice” and the “girly”. Gossip, celebrity friends, and the always-dirty home find a place on the museum's walls, which become a diary full of colourful flowers and clouds. In this way, the artist has developed not only her own approach to image and text but also a feminist strategy: “Nonshouting Feminism” as she calls it.

 Lady Bunny and RuPaul

Lady Bunny and RuPaul

Originally envisioned as a survey show of emerging artists, the fourth instalment of “Greater New York” at MoMA PS1 changes tract and raises the average artist age to a getting-on-a-bit 48. Through the more mature positions the difference between old New York and the “Post-Bloomburg iteration we’ve inherited” becomes startlingly clear. Musing on the inclusion of videos of drag performers by Nelson Sullivan and the cruising photographs of Alvin Baltrop, our writer gets nostalgic for the salad days of NYC.

 Drawing by Dan Perjovich for Spike

Drawing by Dan Perjovich for Spike

Many people are anxious that the growing class divide in the art world and the succession of record-breaking prices paid for contemporary art endanger the belief system supporting it. But why is nobody worried about money itself? Isn’t what happens at an auction that money celebrates its freedom, its release from the burden of being a means of comparison? Is art the new money? On a currency that lives from the bank of the gaze, into which we all make payments.

 McCarren Park Pool in Williamsburg

McCarren Park Pool in Williamsburg

The New York–based artist shows us everything but her studio.

 Crystal Cinema I, Marina Abramovic

Crystal Cinema I, Marina Abramovic

It was one of the biggest meetings of art and pop culture in the last ten years. But was it also a game changer? And what were the consequences for the participants? When Jay-Z adapted Marina Abramović's performance "The Artist is Present" (2010) for his video "Picasso Baby" at New York's Pace Gallery in 2013, many wondered: how did Abramović end up here? New York’s art scene was the audience, with Abramović herself as the star. Looking back, Marina wonders this too. At her recent retrospective at SESC Pompeia, São Paulo, she openly discussed the drawbacks of having replaced the physical, face-to-face encounter with the camera, and having become a brand.

 Photo: Johannes Worsøe Berg

Photo: Johannes Worsøe Berg

The New York-based Norwegian artist is drawn to big subjects – violence, sexuality, destruction, aging, self-expression. His exhibitions are dense installations packed with paintings, sculptures, readymades, photographs, and contributions from friends working with art, design, or literature. Jennifer Krasinski speaks to him about the visual dimension of writing, the death drive in homosexuality, and the irrelevance of cultural relevance.

 Kathy Acker at 26th Studio, New York 1990

Kathy Acker at 26th Studio, New York 1990
Photo: Michel Delsol

Chris Kraus writes about the renewal of interest in this controversial punk icon.

Untitled, 2015
Oil on canvas
16 1/8 x 13 inches (41 x 33 cm)
Framed: 18 5/8 x 15 1/2 x 1 3/4 inches (47.3 x 39.4 x 4.4 cm) 

 

Untitled, 2014
Oil on canvas
10 1/2 x 13 3/4 inches (27 x 35 cm)
Framed: 13 3/16 x 16 1/2 x 1 3/4 inches (33.5 x 41.9 x 4.4 cm)

 

Untitled, c. 1970
Pastel on paper
9 1/2 x 11 13/16 inches (24 x 30 cm)
Framed: 13 1/4 x 15 1/2 x 1 5/8 inches (33.7 x 39.4 x 4.1 cm)

 

 Bjarne Melgaard, »Ignorant Transparencies«, 2013 Installation view at Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York

Bjarne Melgaard, »Ignorant Transparencies«, 2013
Installation view at Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York

 All images: Jordan Wolfson, (Female figure) 2014, 2014 Mixed media Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York/London Photo: John Smith

All images:
Jordan Wolfson, (Female figure) 2014, 2014
Mixed media
Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York/London
Photo: John Smith

For many visitors, Jordan Wolfson’s robot represents a first contact with the most technologically developed and also most disturbing robot they have ever seen. But can the gallery space do justice to the experience? After all, a robot is only as evil as the world into which it is placed.