painting

 Geoengineeringwatch.org, 2016, Gesso and charcoal on canvas, 230 x 166 cm

Geoengineeringwatch.org, 2016, gesso and charcoal on canvas, 230 x 166 cm

R. Lord talks to Ché Zara Blomfield about her first European solo exhibition

 Milk , 2014, oil, acrylic ink on canvas Courtesy of Elisabeth Wingate  

Milk, 2014, oil, acrylic ink on canvas
Courtesy of Elisabeth Wingate

 

In her collages from the beginning of the 1980s, Julia Wachtel made the image-worlds of Pop and trash collide. When she turned to painting, she remained loyal to her technique of hard cuts – which she has maintained ever since. Bob Nickas looks back on the era of infotainment, when picture-making was reinvented.

 Paul Kneale, Bump Bump, 2015 Inkjet print on canvas Courtesy of the Artist and Artuner

Paul Kneale, Bump Bump, 2015
Inkjet print on canvas
Courtesy of the Artist and Artuner

Why is taking a digital image more like painting than analogue photography? Media artist Paul Kneale investigates the fundamental difference between the two modes of production, and sees us as painters stepping back to review the latest brushstrokes of our just-taken selfies. Looking through the haze of his own “optical migraines” Kneale argues for a new form of painting.

 O.T ., 2007 Paper maché, paint, metal All images: Courtesy Galerie Meyer Kainer Foto: Atelier West

O.T., 2007
Paper maché, paint, metal
All images: Courtesy Galerie Meyer Kainer
Foto: Atelier West

How does art come into being? Is it developed deliberately, or is the artist a henchman of demand? An interview by Andreas Reiter Raabe

 I am an artwork and I am 3 years old ,  2004 Acrylic paint on wall and box Courtesy die Künstlerin und kaufmann repetto, Milan/New York

I am an artwork and I am 3 years old, 2004, acrylic paint on wall and box
Courtesy die Künstlerin und kaufmann repetto, Milan/New York

Lily van der Stokker's wall paintings and installations play on the decorative, the “nice” and the “girly”. Gossip, celebrity friends, and the always-dirty home find a place on the museum's walls, which become a diary full of colourful flowers and clouds. In this way, the artist has developed not only her own approach to image and text but also a feminist strategy: “Nonshouting Feminism” as she calls it.

 Photo: eSeL.at

Photo: eSeL.at

Why do you use paintings in your performances?

 Portrait Nicolas Party Photo: Christophe Coënon

Portrait Nicolas Party
Photo: Christophe Coënon

“If you sit on an elephant, your behaviour changes.” Technology may continue to advance, but that doesn’t mean art is getting any better, says Nicolas Party. With a calm and irony-free attitude, he has been developing one of the most idiosyncratic practices among young painters today. A conversation with Rita Vitorelli about naivety, the slowness of matter, and what’s special about the human hand.

 QUASI UNA Spirale, 2008 Acryl auf Leinwand / Acrylic on canvas, 182 x 154 cm Courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York Photo: Jean Vong

Quasi Una Spirale, 2008
Acrylic on canvas
Courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York
Photo: Jean Vong

Why are people now taking a renewed interest in Giorgio Griffa’s work? Perhaps because around 1970 he had already anticipated many of the concerns of painting today, with his serial gestures and unprimed canvases nailed onto the wall. Eva Fabbris writes about how the artist developed a unique position between Conceptual art and Arte Povera.

 Albert Oehlen, Rennkostüm , 2001 Inkjet print, computer painting on paper Courtesy the artist

Albert Oehlen, Rennkostüm, 2001
Inkjet print, computer painting on paper
Courtesy the artist

Artists’ assistants are omnipresent in the art business. Yet, as a rule, they are all but invisible. Ever nameless they disappear from view in artists’ studios; their work is absorbed into their employers’ production and their independent creative participation in the works is subsumed by the artistic “brand” they have helped to form. However, things do seem to be changing. Not only has “Artist’s Assistant” become a recognized occupation, but assistants are starting to emerge from their anonymity and raising their profiles as artists in their own right. Hans-Jürgen Hafner sketches out the situation.

How do digital images change painting?

How painterly is your video work?

 Photo: Marco Anelli, © 2012

Photo: Marco Anelli, © 2012

What do you teach young artists?

 "Untitled", 2012; Oil, paper on canvas, 230 x 180 cm

"Untitled", 2012; Oil, paper on canvas, 230 x 180 cm; © Albert Oehlen, Courtesy Gagosian Gallery; Photo: Lothar Schnepf

Like almost no other artist, Albert Oehlen subjects painting to a stress test. For over 30 years he’s been tinkering with the medium’s source code: colour and paint application, lines and layers, titles and triumphs, disappointments and expectations. These elements are all played against one another and caught off guard. Daniel Baumann leads us through the work.

 Photo: Johannes Worsøe Berg

Photo: Johannes Worsøe Berg

The New York-based Norwegian artist is drawn to big subjects – violence, sexuality, destruction, aging, self-expression. His exhibitions are dense installations packed with paintings, sculptures, readymades, photographs, and contributions from friends working with art, design, or literature. Jennifer Krasinski speaks to him about the visual dimension of writing, the death drive in homosexuality, and the irrelevance of cultural relevance.

A Pamphlet for Talking in front of Art

 Untitled, 2013 Flashe, acrylic, and oil on linen 349 x 305 cm

Untitled, 2013
Flashe, acrylic, and oil on linen
349 x 305 cm

Known as much for her clever plunder of painting’s conventions as for her bumptious mix of high and low cultural references, Los-Angeles painter Laura Owens has by now long outpaced the early trivializations of her work as light-hearted California-girl pictures. In her recent work, Owens gives painting’s gestures her most serious overhaul to date.

Untitled, 2015
Oil on canvas
16 1/8 x 13 inches (41 x 33 cm)
Framed: 18 5/8 x 15 1/2 x 1 3/4 inches (47.3 x 39.4 x 4.4 cm) 

 

Untitled, 2014
Oil on canvas
10 1/2 x 13 3/4 inches (27 x 35 cm)
Framed: 13 3/16 x 16 1/2 x 1 3/4 inches (33.5 x 41.9 x 4.4 cm)

 

Untitled, c. 1970
Pastel on paper
9 1/2 x 11 13/16 inches (24 x 30 cm)
Framed: 13 1/4 x 15 1/2 x 1 5/8 inches (33.7 x 39.4 x 4.1 cm)

 

 Noam in front of his dads sculpture 

Noam in front of his dads sculpture 

Harm van den Dorpel on "having kids in the art world"

 What Sort of Man Reads Playboy?, 2010-2012 Glitter, oil, collage on canvas 137,2 x 124,5 cm Photo: Moritz Frei © Chris Martin Courtesy of Chris Martin and KOW, Berlin

What Sort of Man Reads Playboy?, 2010-2012
Glitter, oil, collage on canvas
137,2 x 124,5 cm
Photo: Moritz Frei
© Chris Martin
Courtesy of Chris Martin and KOW, Berlin

It’s undeniable that Chris Martin’s paintings resemble »outsider art«. Yet I like them not for being intuitive, or spiritual, or liberated from convention – although they are all these things – but because they are affectionate.