technology

 Nobutaka Aozaki, Value Added 240950 (Del Monte whole kernel corn no salt added) , 2012 Canned corn and receipts

Nobutaka Aozaki, Value Added 240950 (Del Monte whole kernel corn no salt added), 2012
Canned corn and receipts

What if you can’t see an event? First of all, it doesn’t matter: anthropocentrism is out and it’s time we accepted that there are events that have nothing to do with humans being around to witness them. Benjamin H. Bratton talks about Google’s Nest, buying a can of corn in the supermarket, and the big question of scale.

 Paul Kneale, Bump Bump, 2015 Inkjet print on canvas Courtesy of the Artist and Artuner

Paul Kneale, Bump Bump, 2015
Inkjet print on canvas
Courtesy of the Artist and Artuner

Why is taking a digital image more like painting than analogue photography? Media artist Paul Kneale investigates the fundamental difference between the two modes of production, and sees us as painters stepping back to review the latest brushstrokes of our just-taken selfies. Looking through the haze of his own “optical migraines” Kneale argues for a new form of painting.

Can hackers really save lives? A member of Ghost Security Group speaks to our writer Paul Feigelfeld. By passing on information to the US secret services, the volunteer network brings a new mentality to hacktivism. Read the full interview here:

 Photo: Alberto Gamazo

Photo: Alberto Gamazo

What does it mean today to have a life with kids, to have a life in art, and to live a life? Why are children and the artist's life so hard to unite? Or is this a false assumption? Spike Art Daily dedicates a series of interviews to the problematic relationship that the art industry has with its offspring. In this interview, curator and theorist Chus Martínez talks about shared realities, competitive situations and why children always open us up.

Tetsumi Kudo, Graft '72 (Greffe '72) (detail) 1972,
Plastic, metal, soil, thermometer, resin, adhesive, paint, hair and rope
Photo: Jessica Eckert
© Estate of Tetsumi Kudo, ADAGP, Paris, ARS, New York and DACS, London 2015, Hiroko Kudo.
Courtesy Hauser & Wirth and Andrea Rosen Gallery

Installation view, "Tetsumi Kudo", Hauser & Wirth London, 2015
© Estate of Tetsumi Kudo, ADAGP, Paris, ARS, New York and DACS, London 2015, Hiroko Kudo
Courtesy Hauser & Wirth and Andrea Rosen Gallery
Photo: Alex Delfanne 

Tetsumi Kudo, Graft '72 (Greffe '72) (detail) 1972,
Plastic, metal, soil, thermometer, resin, adhesive, paint, hair and rope
Photo: Jessica Eckert
© Estate of Tetsumi Kudo, ADAGP, Paris, ARS, New York and DACS, London 2015, Hiroko Kudo
Courtesy Hauser & Wirth and Andrea Rosen Gallery

 Beauty and the Beast , 1991,   film still 

Beauty and the Beast, 1991, film still 

If 72% of 18 to 25-year-olds say they can express their feelings better though using emojis than words what does that mean for the future of written language? Dean Kissick discuses Starbucks conspiracy theories, ordering Domino’s pizza and if heartbreak can be conveyed by pictures of anthropomorphic food.

 Iki Nakagawa, video still, courtesy of The Kitchen

Iki Nakagawa, video still, courtesy of the Kitchen

With his new book the author attempts to turn the “trance” of everyday life pink. While introducing it in New York’s The Kitchen the American poet also played the piano.

 Photo by Calla Henkel and Max Pitegoff  

Photo by Calla Henkel and Max Pitegoff

 

In March this year I visited the artist Simon Denny in his Berlin studio. It was four weeks before his first US solo show (at MoMA P.S.1) and a few more weeks before the 56th Venice Biennale, where he was one of the youngest participants to represent New Zealand, with an exhibition in the Biblioteca Nazionale

 All images: Jordan Wolfson, (Female figure) 2014, 2014 Mixed media Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York/London Photo: John Smith

All images:
Jordan Wolfson, (Female figure) 2014, 2014
Mixed media
Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York/London
Photo: John Smith

For many visitors, Jordan Wolfson’s robot represents a first contact with the most technologically developed and also most disturbing robot they have ever seen. But can the gallery space do justice to the experience? After all, a robot is only as evil as the world into which it is placed.