Jeppe Ugelvig

 Jenny Holzer, Truisms: All things are delicately interconnected, 1977–79 Electronic sign, Installation view Dupont Circle, Washington, DC, 1986. Photo © 1986 Jenny Holzer, Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Jenny Holzer, Truisms: All things are delicately interconnected, 1977–79 Electronic sign, Installation view Dupont Circle, Washington, DC, 1986. Photo © 1986 Jenny Holzer, Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

The endless circuit of global fairs, exhibitions, and biennials once kept the art world perpetually in motion, but Corona has put a stop to all of this, blocking the easy paths to jetsetting. Is that necessarily a bad thing? Or can we find solace and community in our own backyards, with only glimpses of goings-on abroad from our overly Zoom’ed sofas? By JEPPE UGELVIG

By Jeppe Ugelvig

Stay home, stay away, but stay online, for goodness sake. Digital communication has become more of a force than ever in the art world, without the usual galas, openings, and related events. JEPPE UGELVIG dishes the digital dirt. 

Thebe Magugu, SS18 – Gender Studies
Figures of Fortitude (2018)
Photos: Aart Verrips, creative direction & set: Thebe Magugu, assistant: Nhlanhla Masemola

Fashion has built a trap for itself. The most contemporary medium may still pride itself on being ahead of the curve, but it has fallen prey to a totalised corporate capitalist realism that is closing the door on a new generation. Where will it go with its need to rebel and experiment?

Thebe Magugu, SS18 – Gender Studies

Figures of Fortitude (2018)

Photo: Aart Verrips, creative direction & set: Thebe Magugu, assistant: Nhlanhla Masemola

Fashion has built a trap for itself. The most contemporary medium may still pride itself on being ahead of the curve, but it has fallen prey to a totalised corporate capitalist realism that is closing the door on a new generation. Where will it go with its need to rebel and experiment? By Jeppe Ugelvig

 Exhibition view of “Lizzie Fitch | Ryan Trecartin: Whether Line”, Fondazione Prada, 2019 Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy Fondazione Prada Lizzie Fitch | Ryan Trecartin, Neighbor Dub, 2019 15 channel sound, Iron, epoxy powder paint, PVC, wood, stanchions

Exhibition view of “Lizzie Fitch | Ryan Trecartin: Whether Line”, Fondazione Prada, 2019
Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy Fondazione Prada

Neighbor Dub, 2019
15 channel sound, Iron, epoxy powder paint, PVC, wood, stanchions

Jeppe Ugelvig reviews the duo’s latest multimedia-installation ”Whether Line”. Produced in rural Ohio, the ambitious project explores post-Trump American folklore through their neurotic and bewildering lens.

Sandra Mujinga plays with economies of visibility and disappearance. The traditional identity politics of presence is reversed in order to operate out of hidden realms. If everything is surveilled, the biggest potential lies in not being seen. By Jeppe Ugelvig