Protesters pulling down monument of Andrew Jackson, June 22, 2020.

Protesters pulling down monument of Andrew Jackson, June 22, 2020.

The US, Germany, and the world have a Swiss cheese consciousness about history: filled with holes. No righting the ship here, just some stories, and jokes, and some more jokes.

 Soshiro Matsubara,  A Tale of Romance , 2020 (detail), carpet, glazed ceramics, artificial hair, fabric, wood, light sphere, Carpet: 350 × 200 cm, Sculpture ca. 20 × 130 × 90 cm, Lamp ø 28

A Tale of Romance, 2020 (detail), carpet, glazed ceramics, artificial hair, fabric, wood, light sphere, Carpet: 350 × 200 cm, Sculpture ca. 20 × 130 × 90 cm, Lamp ø 28 cm

Japanese-born, Vienna-based artist, Soshiro Matsubara is digging deep into the sordid past and affairs of Viennese love, loss, and revenge, at a recent show in the City of Music where heads were taken off, and Freud was keeping close watch. 

 Iikawa Takehiro,  DECORATOR CRAB, Arrangement, Adjustment, Movement , 2020, installation at Yokohama Triennale 2020. © Iikawa Takehiro Yokohama Triennale 2020

Iikawa Takehiro, DECORATOR CRAB, Arrangement, Adjustment, Movement, 2020, installation view Yokohama Triennale 2020, © Iikawa Takehiro

As the 7th edition of the Yokohama Triennale is set to open in Japan, Francesca Ceccherini sat down with Raqs Media Collective to discuss their curatorial strategy, and how the exhibition has developed online, in print, and elsewhere.

Is there such a thing as Deleter’s Remorse? NATASHA STAGG’S fourth column sifts through the aftermath of her deleted Instagram account, and all of the things she misses – and doesn't miss – about the social media giant. Who knows? Maybe she'll create a Finsta profile now in its place. 

 Susan Ryan as "Lolita" in Stanley Kubrick's Lolita , 1962

Sue Lyon as "Lolita" in Stanley Kubrick's Lolita, 1962

Gimme Fiction! For her latest column, KAITLIN PHILLIPS takes us on a pretend journey through the ins and outs of worklife, and all of the crazy creatures that rear their cute little heads – from drunk monk haircuts to desperate stuffed animal keychains.  

 All photos by Natasha Stagg

All photos by Natasha Stagg

NATASHA STAGG’S third column focuses on speech acts, and the elected officials who seem incapable of delivering them with any eloquence. As the US just celebrated the 4th of July, maybe the fireworks will do a better job of speaking for New Yorkers than the old dudes behind a podium.

NATASHA STAGG’S second column gives us another snapshot of New York in the midst of a struggle between justice for its citizens and the desire to pose for a close-up. Spoiler alert: Stagg has parted ways with the selfie-behemoth, Instagram, in the process of writing this.   

 Photo: Magali Bragard

Photo: Magali Bragard

What Pleasure is There in Thinking Today?

 Nancy Lupo, Bench 2017 (pink concave) , 2018 Steel, rubber feet, and fluorocarbon metallic paint, 190 x 90 x 64 cm

Nancy Lupo, Bench 2017 (pink concave), 2018, Steel, rubber feet, and fluorocarbon metallic paint, 190 x 90 x 64 cm

To varying degrees, many of us now know the feeling of being trapped indoors, whether because of lockdown or fear of infection or transmission. As Lonely in Shanghai turns to Grindr and internet porn, the line between imagined and actual encounters starts to become blurry and dream life feels as real as anything else. By ALVIN LI

For this issue we gave our contributors carte blanche: an open invitation to tell us what’s in their heads, right now. Whether under lockdown inside, or outside under protest, it is clear that the mind has no off-switch. Whether deeply personal, or overtly political, our authors continue to surprise with their level of insight and the playfulness of their imagination.

 Messages for the City, Various artists, April 2020 – ongoing. Poster House, PRINT Magazine, and For Freedoms

Messages for the City, Various artists, April 2020 – ongoing. Poster House, PRINT Magazine, and For Freedoms

Summer is here, so let’s go out of state! Frequent Spike contributor and New York denizen, NATASHA STAGG, is back with a weekly column for the remainder of the warm season. In her first of the series, Stagg talks about branding, policing, and the endless stream of images that fill our screens and our squares (the big ones).